Resin Material

Resins are used in casting for low-volume production, props, in the medical industry, and more. It requires molds, which are filled with liquid resin and hardens inside polymerizing. Some resins are easy to use and compatible with silicone or DIY molds, so even hobbyists can use them without special tooling to produce parts. The liquid nature of resin material also allows mixing it with additives for improving its properties and easier removal of molds.

Glass transition temperature (Tg) 120 - 130 °C
Tensile strength 85 N/mm²
Tensile Modulus 10,500 N/mm²
Elongation at break 0.8%
Flexural strength 112 N/mm²
Flexural Modulus 10,000 N/mm²
Compressive Strength 190 N/mm²
Coefficient of linear thermal expansion 34 10-6
Water absorption - 24 hours at 23°C 5-10 mg (0.06-0.068) % ISO 62 (1980)
Advantages
  • Precision
  • Large variety of resins with different properties
  • A wide range of applications
  • Can be food-safe
  • Can be easily colored, dyed, mixed with metal powders or fluorescent pigments
  • Easy to work with
  • Hardened resins can be machined
Disadvantages
  • Some resins are toxic
  • Fast polymerization reaction requires being quick
  • Requires special storing (some resins are sensitive to moisture, temperature and light)
  • Casting Resins need components accuracy
  • Low volume casting may require much handwork, which makes its net cost high